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Disputas: Joseph Odeke-Nato

Master Joseph Odeke-Nato ved Institutt for pedagogikk vil forsvare sin avhandling Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Teacher Education. Towards facilitating conducive learning environments for learners with visual impairment for graden Philosophiae doctor.

Bildet kan inneholde: person, panne, nese, kinn, øyenbryn.

Joseph Odeke-Nato. Foto: privat

Tid og sted for prøveforelesning

Theoretical and practical implications when using the term “tool” to portray and analyze the use of ICT in teaching and learning contexts

Prøveforelesningen starter 18. mars, kl. 10.15.

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Bedømmelseskomité

  • 1. opponent Professor Lars Frers, Universitetet i Sørøst Norge
  • 2. opponent Professor Leikny Øgrim, OsloMet 
  • Komitéleder Professor Greta Björk Gudmundsdottir, Universitetet i Oslo

Leder av disputas

Instituttleder Professor Tone Kvernbekk

Veileder

Sammendrag

This study was carried out with the intention of finding out how preservice teachers are taught to use ICT as a pedagogical tool to support conducive learning environments for learners with visual impairment. I used the qualitative research approach. Through this approach, I collected data using interviews, which I later analyzed thematically. The data are based on 20 participants: 16 early career teachers, two teacher educators, one participant from the curriculum-developing institution, and one from the Uganda National Association of the Blind.

The theory that guided my study is Actor Network theory (ANT). I assumed that ANT was appropriate for a study like this one that involves both human and nonhuman actors. I assumed ANT could help me extract information that could be used to conceptualize how both human and nonhuman actors are useful in teaching the use of ICT as a pedagogical tool for learners with visual impairment. The presentation, interpretation, analysis, and discussion of data that are generated by themes are discussed with the guidance of the actor-network theory (ANT).

My analysis reveals three major issues. The first issue that came out prominently is that ICT is being taught to preservice teachers. Although preservice teachers are being taught ICT, it does not guarantee that they use it as a pedagogical tool. This rises from the experience that teachers use ICT while teaching learners with visual impairment, but they do not use it as a pedagogical tool. Secondly, teacher educators are engaged in preparing preservice teachers to develop skills in using ICT. Data further reveal that, although teacher educators are engaged in teaching ICT to preservice teachers, there is a need to take into account that they (preservice teachers) are taught to use ICT as a pedagogical tool for learners with visual impairment. Thirdly, my analysis shows that Ministry of Education and Sports (MoES), Ministry of Information and Communications Technology (MoICT), the Uganda National Association of the Blind (UNAB), and the primary teachers’ colleges (PTCs) are involved in teacher education at different capacities with minimal collaboration on teacher education.

Publisert 4. mars 2021 17:17 - Sist endret 24. mars 2021 14:55