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Effective school-work transition processes for students with mild intellectual disability

The Project aims to gather knowledge about the characteristics of successful transitions from school to working life for young adults with mild intellectual disability.

man working at a cafe. photo.

The World Health Organization states that persons with mild intellectual disability can contribute with practical tasks in the labor market. Yet, less than three percent is engaged in ordinary labor, and many miss out on the benefits that work can provide. (illustration photo: Colourbox)

About the project

This research project aims to gather knowledge about the characteristics of successful transitions from school to working life for young adults with mild intellectual disability.

Moreover, researchers will assess the expectations, experiences and needs of employers concerning the employment of persons with intellectual disability.

Based on this information, researchers will develop a transition manual for educators, pedagogical-psychological services and employment services. Such a manual may contribute to a more streamlined school-work transition for persons with intellectual disability.

Aims

The project has three aims:

  1. To explore the characteristics of best-case scenarios in which young adults with mild intellectual disability have managed to enter the labor market after completing secondary school;
  2. To assess expectations, experiences, and needs of employers concerning the employment of persons with intellectual disability;
  3. To develop a transition manual that can be used as a practical tool to streamline the school-work transition process for young adults with intellectual disability.

Background

The World Health Organization states that persons with mild intellectual disability can contribute with practical tasks in the labor market. Yet, less than three percent is engaged in ordinary labor, and many miss out on the benefits that work can provide, such as a feeling of competence, social belonging, and autonomy.

This four-year project uses qualitative case studies and a quantitative survey for the development of a manual that can help persons with intellectual disability to gain access to the labor market.

Financing

The project is funded by the Norwegian Research Council.

Cooperation

The project is a collaboration between the Department of Special Needs Education, UiO, the Department of Vocational Teacher Training, Oslo Metropolitan University, and NTNU Samfunnsforskning (NTNU Social Research).

 

Published May 6, 2020 9:12 AM - Last modified Nov. 3, 2020 9:03 AM

Contact

portraitfoto
Hanne Marie Høybråten Sigstad, Associate Professor at the Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo (photo: Colvin, UiO)